allow


allow
allow
1. This verb matches admit in having a wide range of common uses, transitive and intransitive, with that-clauses, and with an infinitive complement. For several centuries it has alternated in many meanings with the phrasal verb allow of; some of these meanings are now obsolete, but one has survived, presumably to avoid ambiguity with allow = ‘permit, authorize’, although it sounds old-fashioned (e.g.

• Jortin is willing to allow of [= accept as valid] other miracles —J. R. Lowell, 1849).

2. In the meanings ‘to acknowledge, concede’, allow followed by a clause has been in continuous use since the 17c (e.g.

• I suppose it will be allowed us that marriage is a human society —Milton, 1643

• ‘You know best, Captain,’ Hugh Macroon allowed with grave courtesy —Compton Mackenzie, 1947

• Kerry never allowed that perhaps the greatest failure has been that of Nato countries to provide the peacekeepers they had promised —weblog, BrE 2002 [OEC]).

3. The construction allow as how, meaning ‘to state as an opinion, have to admit that’ is restricted to AmE and dialect uses

• (She allowed as how my old friend J. J. was flying on Monday morning —N. Thornburg, 1976

• He allowed as how she was faithful —T. Morrison, 1981).


Modern English usage. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • allow — al‧low [əˈlaʊ] verb [transitive] 1. ACCOUNTING when the tax authorities allow an amount, cost, or expense, they permit it not to be counted as part of income or profits: • You re allowed a certain amount a year in personal allowances, before you… …   Financial and business terms

  • Allow — Al*low , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Allowed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Allowing}.] [OE. alouen, OF. alouer, aloer, aluer, F. allouer, fr. LL. allocare to admit as proved, to place, use; confused with OF. aloer, fr. L. allaudare to extol; ad + laudare to praise …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • allow — al·low /ə lau̇/ vt: to give approval of or permission for: as a: to grant fulfillment of allow ed her petition for relief b: to decide in favor of allow a deduction on a tax return c: to permit to be presented …   Law dictionary

  • allow — [ə lou′] vt. [ME alowen < OFr alouer < ML allocare, ALLOCATE; assoc. with OFr alouer < L allaudare, to extol < ad , to + laudare, to praise] 1. to let do, happen, etc.; permit; let [we weren t allowed to go] 2. to let have [she… …   English World dictionary

  • allow — [v1] admit; acknowledge acquiesce, avow, concede, confess, grant, let on, own; concepts 60,82 Ant. deny, refuse, reject allow [v2] permit an action accord, accredit, admit, approve, authorize, bear, be big*, be game for*, brook, certify,… …   New thesaurus

  • Allow — Al*low , v. i. To admit; to concede; to make allowance or abatement. [1913 Webster] Allowing still for the different ways of making it. Addison. [1913 Webster] {To allow of}, to permit; to admit. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • allow — ► VERB 1) admit as legal or acceptable. 2) permit to do something. 3) (allow for) take into consideration when making plans or calculations. 4) provide or set aside for a particular purpose. 5) admit the truth of. DERIVATIVES …   English terms dictionary

  • allow me — allow ˈme idiom used to offer help politely • ‘Allow me,’ he said, taking the tray from her. Main entry: ↑allowidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • allow — (v.) early 14c., to commend or praise; late 14c., recognize or admit (a privilege, excuse, etc.) as valid; sanction, permit; early 15c., take into account or give credit for (of business matters), from Anglo Fr. alouer, O.Fr. aloer (13c.) allot,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • allow — 1 permit, suffer, *let, leave Analogous words: tolerate, endure, stand, brook (see BEAR): accede, acquiesce (see ASSENT): *yield, submit, defer Antonyms: inhibit Contrasted words: *forbid, prohibit, enjoin: * …   New Dictionary of Synonyms


We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.